1:5:10:365 EcoTip Blog

July 21, 2008

:203 Rotten Egg Odor

Filed under: :203 Rotten Egg Odor — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — John Banta @ 5:49 am

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:203 EcoTip: A rotten egg – sulpher like odor coming from the sink may be your sinks drain or your hot water heater. To test and figure out which it is – run some hot water into a glass. Step away from the sink and swirl the water then sniff it – kind of like checking the quality of wine. If the rotten egg smell is in the water then the problem is probably your hot water heater. If its not in the glass of water, it is probably your septic drain.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Tomorrow I will begin discussing these problems cause and solution.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

Advertisements

July 20, 2008

:202 Strap Water Heaters

Filed under: :202 Strap Waterheaters — Tags: , , , , , — John Banta @ 5:57 am

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:202 EcoTip: It is important to strap the hot water heater securely to the adjoining wall. As long as the hot water heater remains upright, the water inside can be used for emergency purposes.

 

***********************************

 Additional Information:

You should have flexible fittings for utilities such as hot water heaters, natural gas lines, and propane tanks to lessen the risk of line breakage.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 19, 2008

:201 Shower Filters

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:201 EcoTip: Shower filters with KDF (kinetic degradation fluxation) are good for chlorine removal since they work better with hot water. Activated carbon works better for cold water.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :190, :191, :192, :195,

KDF is a zinc and copper alloy that reacts with chlorine transforming it into a chloride salt. The zinc and copper alloy metal helps control bacteria growth and can remove some heavy metals. Since KDF works well at higher temperatures, it outperforms other purification measures for shower and bath water, but the range of contaminants removed is somewhat limited.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 18, 2008

:200 Sanitizing Water Purifiers

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:200 EcoTip: The build-up of bacteria that occurs in water purification units can be cleaned using food grade hydrogen peroxide when filters are changed. It can also be used to sanitize bottled water dispensers.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Food grade hydrogen peroxide is usually available at health food stores. Make sure you read the label directions. Detailed instructions for sanitizing water purification units using hydrogen peroxide is available at:  http://www.watertechonline.com/article.asp?IndexID=5180706

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 17, 2008

:199 Fan Direction

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:199 EcoTip: Ceiling fans can reduce summer air conditioning costs by increasing evaporative cooling on the skin and allowing you to run the AC at a higher temperature setting. During the summer, operate your ceiling fan so that it is blowing air downward. To check to see if it is rotating in the correct direction – stand directly beneath the fan while it operates on high. If you feel a breeze, the blades are spinning in the correct direction.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 16, 2008

:198 Ozone Water Purification

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:198 EcoTip: Ozone has some uses for killing bacteria as a part of water purification. This method has become popular for spas and swimming pools permitting a reduced amount of chlorine to be used. When used for drinking water purification, it should be combined with other types of filtration and purification to address contaminants that ozone doesn’t reduce.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :190, :191, :192, :193, :194, :195, :196, :197

Ozone has been used for helping to achieve low bacteria levels in spas, hot tubs, wells, pools and water purification units. One way of generating ozone uses UV light which was discussed yesterday in :197.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 15, 2008

:197 UV Water Purification

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:197 EcoTip: Ultra Violet Light (UV) has some uses for killing bacteria as a part of water purification. Think of it as an alternative to chlorination. Unlike chlorine it has no residual effect.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :190, :191, :192, :193, :194, :195, :196

UV has been used for helping to achieve low bacteria levels in spas, hot tubs, wells and water purification units. The UV light needs to be shielded so it is concentrated on the water and avoids causing damage to people’s eyes and skin. UV is rendered useless when “shadowing” occurs. In order for it to be effective the bacteria must be exposed to the UV light. Sediment, hardness, minerals, iron, manganese or turbidity will also make the UV system ineffective because the bacteria is shielded from the UV.

This information was paraphrased from the third edition (released in May 2008 ) of Prescriptions for a Healthy House: A Practical Guide for Architects, Builders & Homeowners which I wrote with architect Paula Baker-LaPorte and physician Erica Elliott.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 14, 2008

:196 Bacteria Contamination

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:196 EcoTip: Bacteria can contaminate and grow in water purification systems. They need to be properly cleaned when they are serviced to keep them in good working order.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :190, :191, :192, :193, :194

The following information is quoted from the third edition (released in May 2008 ) of Prescriptions for a Healthy House: A Practical Guide for Architects, Builders & Homeowners:

Reverse Osmosis units should be tested and serviced on a regular basis. Annual testing of water quality is a good indicator of how well the unit is functioning and when the reverse osmosis membrane needs to be replaced. Poor water quality in some parts of the country means that membranes and filters need to be replaced more frequently there.

Servicing includes not only replacing filters as necessary but also cleaning and disinfecting the unit. The procedure involves disassembling the reverse osmosis system, cleaning the unit, flushing it with hydrogen peroxide, replacing the filters, and checking the unit’s performance.

– quoted from Warren Clough – a chemist with 50 years experience analyzing water quality and making water purification system recommendations. www.ozarkwaterandair.org

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 13, 2008

:195 Water Softener Salt

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:195 EcoTip: Water softeners add salt to the water. The amount of sodium is usually small, but for those on a restricted sodium diet, reverse osmosis can reduce the levels of sodium chloride. Another alternative would be to use potassium chloride salt instead of sodium chloride. Potassium chloride may contain traces of naturally occurring beta radiation.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :172, :190, :191, :192, :193, :194

The following information is quoted from the third edition (released in May 2008 ) of Prescriptions for a Healthy House: A Practical Guide for Architects, Builders & Homeowners:

Water conditioners are used to improve the aesthetic quality of water, including color, corrosiveness, clarity, and hardness. They use a process of ion exchange to eliminate from the water undesirable substances (such as calcium and magnesium) that may precipitate scale on fixtures, laundry machines, hot water heaters, dishwashers, shower stalls, sinks, and skin. Water conditioners can also be effective in removing sediment, chlorine, and certain metals, such as low levels of manganese and iron (both of which can cause stains) as well as odor from hydrogen sulfide. Flow rate is affected by both the size and the design of the water softener and must be appropriately specified on an individual basis. Conditioned water is often referred to as “soft” water. In the ion exchange process, calcium or magnesium ions are exchanged with either sodium or potassium. Sodium chloride is the more common regenerate for water conditioning, but many water treatment companies have switched to potassium chloride, which is widely believed to be a healthier and more ecologically sound choice. Potassium chloride is essentially a refined potash, and when returned to the ground water it can serve as a fertilizer for many plants. The small amount ingested daily from water conditioned with potassium is about equivalent to what you would gain by eating half a banana and can be a positive addition to your diet.

For those with a medical condition affecting electrolyte balance, blood pressure, or kidney function, we suggest you consult a physician before you consider purchasing a water-conditioning system with salt-based regenerates. Potassium chloride may also contain traces of naturally occurring gross beta radiation. Because of chloride discharge into city systems and the subsequent impact of chlorides on rivers and agriculture, some municipalities are moving to ban new salt-regenerating water conditioners and give rebates to customers who switch to salt-free systems. Municipal water and sewer systems are not configured to remove chlorides. This issue is of particular concern in dense metropolitan areas, but since the ion exchange process is also commonly used to remove water contaminants in private domestic wells, chlorides also are discharged into septic systems and ultimately into shallow aquifers.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

July 12, 2008

:194 RO Waste Water

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:194 EcoTip: Reverse osmosis units use several gallons of water to process each gallon of drinking water. The process water is frequently routed down the drain – but it could easily be used to drip water plants, or for other non-drinking uses.

***********************************

 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :172, :190, :191, :192, :193

The following information is quoted from the third edition (released in May 2008 ) of Prescriptions for a Healthy House: A Practical Guide for Architects, Builders & Homeowners:

The most valid criticism of RO is that anywhere from 3.5 to 5 gallons of water are rejected for every gallon of purified water produced. Many inexpensive, non certified RO systems have much higher rejection rates, are extremely wasteful, and still do not deliver verifiable contaminant reduction, the primary reason for using reverse osmosis.  

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.