1:5:10:365 EcoTip Blog

December 20, 2008

:355 Thermal Heat Detector

Take the 1:5:10:365 challenge: Do one thing – for 5 to 10 minutes – 365 days a year to make our home and planet environment better.

1:5:10:355 EcoTip: Air infiltration and missing insulation in our homes is a major energy waster. Thermal imaging is a sophisticated way to have your home analysed for these issues – but Black and Decker has come up with an inexpensive do-it-yourself Thermal Heat Detector. It allows you to set a base temperature and then scan for temperature variations – which can indicate energy loss.

p91097b

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 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :040, :041, :042, :043, :044

In the winter if you are inside the house, one would look for cold spots. Standing outside one would look for warm spots. If you are using it during the summer it would be the opposite.

More information is available at: http://www.blackanddecker.com/productguide/product-details.aspx?productid=20626

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November 13, 2008

:318 Predict Ice Dams

Take the 1:5:10:365 challenge: Do one thing – for 5 to 10 minutes – 365 days a year to make our home and planet environment better.

1:5:10:318 EcoTip: Thermal imaging can be used to predict locations on the roof where ice dams are likely to form. The thermal imaging camera is used to locate hot spots. These represent the areas where snow will melt. If the melted snow has to run down an area of roof where the water will refreeze, then the formation of an ice dam becomes more likely.

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Courtesy of MoistureView.com

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 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :313, :317

The large blue area in the thermal image above represents a cold area with missing insulation where the attic eave vent is located. The heat from the house will escape upwards warming the underside of the roof. If snow is present the extra warmth may cause it to melt and run down the roof onto the cold overhang. If conditions are right the water will refreeze and form a dam that prevents subsequent water flowing downward from draining off the roof. This water can then migrate into the home. This thermal image can be used to predict that water from any ice dam that forms from this missing insulation is more likely to drain down into the wall cavity causing damage.

Tomorrow’s 1:5:10:365 EcoTip will show how this eave area could be insulated and ventilated at the same time.

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November 9, 2008

:314 Emergency Pipe Protection

Take the 1:5:10:365 challenge: Do one thing – for 5 to 10 minutes – 365 days a year to make our home and planet environment better.

1:5:10:314 EcoTip:  If you believe your plumbing is at risk of freezing and bursting, you may be able to prevent that from happening by opening the spigot at the furthest faucet along the plumbing line and let it drip. Of course this wastes water, but it is likely to waste far less than if the plumbing were to burst. If you decide to catch the water in a bucket for later use, let it run directly into the bucket. Never leave hoses connected to spigots in the winter. The hose is more likely to freeze all the way back to the spigot causing a rupture.

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 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :312, 313

Climate change isn”t only about warming. In my book- Extreme Weather Hits Home: Protecting Your Building From Climate Change, I discuss how to prepare your home for cold snaps and other extreme weather conditions.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

November 8, 2008

:313 Winter Thermal Imaging

Take the 1:5:10:365 challenge: Do one thing – for 5 to 10 minutes – 365 days a year to make our home and planet environment better.

1:5:10:312 EcoTip: Winter thermal imaging can be effectively performed anytime the temperature difference between the inside and outside 20 degrees F or greater. The temperature difference is necessary so that cold spots such as missing insulation and air infiltration can be observed. This is a good way for checking to see if insulation in wall cavities or attics with plumbing are adequately insulated to prevent freezing of pipes.

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The missing insulation shown in this Fluke thermal image shows up as being cold. If there were plumbing in the area where the insulation is missing – there would be a risk of it freezing in a cold snap.

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 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :311

A thermographer qualified to perform energy audits should be able to take the information gathered during a thermal imaging scan of exterior walls with plumbing and calculate the outdoor temperature that would be cold enough to cause plumbing pipes to freeze. By having this information you can monitor weather reports and take additional precautions during cold snaps when your plumbing is at risk.

Climate change isn”t only about warming. In my book- Extreme Weather Hits Home: Protecting Your Building From Climate Change, I discuss how to prepare your home for cold snaps and other extreme weather conditions.

Would you like to receive an email alert for each new 1:5:10:365 EcoTip? Sign up for a Google Alert.

August 6, 2008

:219 Summer Thermal Image Scan

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet environment.

1:5:10:219 EcoTip: Thermal imaging uses infrared energy to track sources of energy loss. There are many ways thermal imaging can be used to help diagnose hidden conditions but they all rely on temperature differences, Having you home scanned in summer can help identify issues related to hot outdoor conditions that might not be visible during other times of the year.

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 Additional Information:

Suggested Review: :036, 037

The thermal image above shows areas of missing insulation in the summer (the red/orange areas). Compare this to :036 which shows heat escaping from a home’s eves in winter (the red/orange areas) and :037 which shows cold spots (the blue areas) which represent missing insulation in winter.

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