1:5:10:365 EcoTip Blog

December 7, 2008

:342 Innovative Window Design

Filed under: :342 Innovative Window Design — Tags: , , , , , — John Banta @ 12:22 am

Take the 1:5:10:365 challenge: Do one thing – for 5 to 10 minutes – 365 days a year to make our home and planet environment better.

1:5:10:342 EcoTip: Low-E windows have a coating that allows light to pass but helps block heat from entering through the window in summer. In winter this coating blocks the passive solar heat that could help warm our home. Now a German company is offering a window that can be spun around, depending on the season, to block or allow the solar heat gain.

windowksd  http://www.ecologicalinnovations.com/index.htm

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October 27, 2008

:301 Indoor Dew Point

Filed under: :301 Indoor Dew Point — Tags: , , , , , , , — John Banta @ 12:17 am

Take the 1:5:10:365 challange: Do one thing – for 5 to 10 minutes – 365 days a year to make our home and planet environment better.

1:5:10:301 EcoTip: When using a set back thermostat the minimum indoor temperatures should be kept well above the dew point temperature. The dew point is the temperature that results in condensation forming. For example if you have the indoor temperature set at 68 degrees F and the indoor relative humidity is 50%, setting the thermostat back ten degrees would cause the relative humidity to go up to approximately 75%.  If the relative humidity goes a little higher than this for a short period – it should be okay, but if the humidity stays over 70% for a couple of days dust mites and microorganisms may find favorable niches to begin growing.

You can use the surface temperature of your windows to predict how far you can set back your thermostat. If the temperature of the window gets cold enough to reach the dew point (100% relative humidity) and condensation begins to form on the surface, you should try to keep the minimum set-back temperature of the room at least ten degrees warmer than the temperature of the window when the condensation first starts to form.

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Suggested Review: :116, :300

Tomorrow’s tip is about window condensation.

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May 3, 2008

:124 Window Leaks

Filed under: :124 Window Leaks — Tags: , , , , , , — John Banta @ 12:25 am

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet.

1:5:10:124 Tip: Windows can leak in ways that aren’t obvious. Today’s tip is to temporarily block those weep holes I talked about yesterday with some soft putty and fill the bottom track with water. Watch to see if the water visibly leaks out or the water level drops. If so – then fix the leaks. Don’t forget to unblock the weep holes when you are finished with the test. Plan on letting the water stand in the track for about an hour. If you can see the water level dropping then stop the test early by opening up the weep holes and letting the track drain. Long term water leaking into wall cavities through window leaks can cause mold growth in the wall cavity. So these types of problems need to be discovered and fixed early. The amount of water that might go into the wall from the test is small enough that it shouldn’t cause a problem by itself – but depending on how long the leak has been present – there may have already been enough water entry to cause a mold problem. When in doubt – its best to call in a professional to confirm the nature of the leaks and make repairs.

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Suggested Review – 123

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May 2, 2008

:123 Window Weep Holes

Filed under: :123 Window Weep Holes — Tags: , , , , , , , , — John Banta @ 12:24 am

Welcome to today’s 1:5:10:365 Tip for becoming a better steward for our home and planet.

1:5:10:123 EcoTip: Most windows have small weep holes that allow water to drain. It is important to keep these weep holes free of debris so that water can drain instead of being trapped.

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When the window weep holes accumulate dirt, leaves, stucco, paint or other debris and become clogged, the water in the windowsill can leak over the track into the home. The weep holes should be carefully inspected to be sure they are kept clean. You can clean out blocked weep holes with a straightened paper clip or other small wire or stick.

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